Menu

COVID-19 Questions?

Learn more about UW’s COVID response; email covidresponse@vc.wisc.edu or call (608) 262-7777.

Growing the future

The University of Wisconsin-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences is an engine of scientific discovery, with researchers working across the spectrum of agricultural and life sciences. Academically, the college offers research-based, hands-on teaching of undergraduates; world-class graduate programs rich in research and project assistantships; and short courses, workshops and other programs. Our outreach activities bring the work of the college to Wisconsin businesses, organizations and communities throughout the state. Learn more about CALS.

sidebar_fold Created with Sketch.

Events

Explore

More CALS events Diversity and Inclusion Majors
Home
glare Created with Sketch.
card_styles Created with Sketch.
Ymd Time

Title

Home
glare Created with Sketch.
card_styles Created with Sketch.
Ymd Time

Title

Home
glare Created with Sketch.
card_styles Created with Sketch.
Ymd Time

Title

Home
glare Created with Sketch.
card_styles Created with Sketch.
Ymd Time

Title

If we have a set of genes that we know are associated with risk for autism, we can use those genes as a place to start in terms of understanding biology.

CALS Faces

Donna Werling

Growing up, Donna Werling often babysat her younger cousin who was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. This was in the early 2000s, and after a string of weekly therapy sessions, she began to see they weren’t really working. She realized that if this was the best doctors could do for her cousin, then they truly didn’t know enough about the nature of autism. Those insights marked a key turning point for Werling. She wanted to understand what autism does at a biological level and how the brain of an autistic person develops. That desire stayed with her throughout her college career and into a neuroscience Ph.D. program. In October 2019, Werling became an assistant professor with the Department of Genetics, where she studies sex differential biology in brain development and how genes affect autism risk.
Read more: go.wisc.edu/6xpw5b

All Ways Forward
Our History
Moves Us Forward.
allwaysforward